MIM

POWER

digital festival

artists meet and greets

workshops

film festival

mim wellness week

Emily taylor 

interview

1. How has your art/creative process been impacted by COVID-19?

My creative process has been pretty much stopped because of COVID-19. Unfortunately, I am someone who suffers badly from depression, which I am very open about, but because of COVID-19 I’m no longer able to go out and do photoshoots with models which was one of my big sources of happiness. However, it’s not all sad and gloom, my creative process has been changed into the form of planning. I have been using my time to create a lot of mood boards and writing down different ideas for photoshoots. I have also been looking into self portraiture more and seeing how I can represent myself to the world. 

 

2. Have you been working on any specific art pieces or series lately?

I have a big series in the plan, I am going to be doing a self portraiture piece of looking at my life and how I deal with depression and anxiety. Using the time I have now I am able to plan out a lot of different ideas and try and boost my confidence to become the model in my work instead of just being the photographer. This is a big step for me and hopefully one day I will feel confident enough to achieve this goal.

 

3. Where do you find inspiration for your work?

I find a lot of inspiration from films, I am a big nerd when it comes to cinematography and I have a huge love for films. One of my favourite directors is Edgar Wright and although he explores a comedy/action side to his films he still inspires me even though that has nothing to do with my work. I love his use of angles and colourings and how he has a lot of thought put into costumes and props and this is something that inspires me to look at small details when I’m taking photos. I want my angles and outfits to be able to tell a story on it’s own, not only when it’s fully put together. 

 

4. How have you been practicing self care during this time? 

I have been getting dressed and doing my make up some days and just trying to pretend that I have places to go ha, even though in reality I go to the fridge, eat too much food and then go back to bed. I have been doing a lot of photoshoots with my younger sister and this has helped me to explore different ideas but in most cases I am lying in bed reading books and watching tv. If you need a good book recommendation I would suggest Elton John’s autobiography, gotta love that man. 

 

5. If you are a working artist, how have you been finding ways to earn income during quarantine? 

Unfortunately, I am not lucky enough to be a working artist, that’s the goal one day but at the moment I’m still living with my mum and sister but I am lucky enough to have a supportive mum who is willing to help me out whenever I need it and give me a roof over my head, so shout out to the mother, thank you for being a wonderful person!

 

6. What does the theme power mean to you?

Power to me is so much more than a word. Power is how you can change the world around you, it defines you as a person. I believe everyone is capable of being powerful, in their own way. Power doesn’t come in the form of money or being loud. Maybe it does when you look at it from a political point of view but to me it means getting out of bed in the morning, going to work, helping your loved ones, being kind. I think that just being a good person is more powerful than anyone can imagine. Always treat people with kindness. 

 

7. How does the theme power apply to the work you submitted for this edition?

 

The theme power applies to my work by representing a controversial issue. I wanted to represent God as being a strong, independent black woman and although some people might find this wrong and disgraceful, well to them, I say we all have our own opinions but in reality nobody knows what God looks like and I believe that if God is real then they would be happy with however you portrayed them because we all have our own say in the world, which to me is pretty damn powerful. 

 

8. What advice would you give people who are struggling to make or art or be creative during quarantine? 

I am one of these people and sometimes I should take my own advice but it’s not always as easy as that and to anyone struggling I want to say it’s okay. You’re allowed to have days, weeks, even months where you’re not creative. It’s not something that can come easy. Sometimes you need to focus on yourself first and then the art will come. I’m one of those people that can be unbelievably creative for months and then one day I suddenly feel uninspired. I think everyone probably goes through situations like this, so please never feel alone and that you’re not good at what you do because you’re not creative 24/7, it’s okay. Take some deep breaths, remember that quarantine won’t last forever and as cringy as it is, the world is your oyster, or canvas I guess, you do what you want with it. 

giveaway

giveaways for the new magazine edition!

designed by fashion designer Hawwaa Ibrahim

jason starr 

interview

Jason is a commercial, fashion, and fine art photographer currently based out of Pennsylvania and Virginia. He attends James Madison University where he studies political science and studio art. For more information regarding Jason or his work, visit http://jasonstarr.format.com

1. How has your art/creative process been impacted by COVID-19?

In almost every way. People to work with, access to resources, ability to utilize locations has 

been hindered. At the same, isolation has pushed my creative boundaries by forcing me to take 

advantage of the things I have around me... I recently used a shoot just using a refrigerator light. 

2. Have you been working on any specific art pieces or series lately?

I have been taking the time to focus on 35mm photography... something new to me. Digital is 

still my go to but I have found the challenge of film to be entertaining. 

3. Where do you find inspiration for your work?

Primarily from the people in my life and the environment around me. Although, a decent amount 

of my ideas have come from some sort of dream state. 

4. If you are a working artist, how have you been finding ways to earn income during 

quarantine? 

I freelance! So I have just been shooting campaigns that allow me to take photos from my home.

 

6. What does the theme power mean to you?

For me, power is boldness. The ability to enact change. 

7. How does the theme power apply to the work you submitted for this edition?

My piece specifically focuses on the relationship between femininity and power. The two are 

often seen as opposites, so we tried to challenge that notion. 

8. What advice would you give people who are struggling to make or art or be creative 

during quarantine? 

Take a look around you to gain a perspective. Adapt to the changes and utilize your resources 

creatively. Use your current emotions and feels to help guide you!

hawwaa ibrahim 

interview

My name is Hawwaa Ibrahim. I am a 20-year-old non-binary Queer Muslim designer. I’m originally from Minnesota but I currently live in New York City! I began designing by watching YouTube tutorials and ending up growing from there. I spent the beginning of my fashion career designing runway collections and now am focusing on my brand “because”. I want to create fashion that is fun and embraces the child in ourselves. It is a genderless brand that is all-inclusive no matter anyone's gender identity, sexual orientation, race, or religion.

 

The Smiley Face dress photo and the other photo with the same background we’re both taken by Pierre Ware 

samantha boucher

interview

Samantha is a poet, artist, and student based out of the Adirondack Mountains.  When she's not writing poems about crushes and trees in her backyard, she can be found dancing with her friends or hanging out with her cat.  She's currently working on a new collection of poems and learning how to play the ukulele.

TOto stoffels

interview

A young queer artist located in the Hague, the Netherlands. 

With a focus on photography and tech infused media the goal is to dissect the so called truths of daily life. Dumb photos of a new world is what I strive for. 

1. How has your art/creative process been impacted by COVID-19?

 

My creative process went through quite some phases during the time of quarantine. It started off with feeling the freedom to create whatever I wanted, but after a while this feeling turned into pressure of not creating enough which forced me to reflect and re-embrace the realisation that the creation of work is a process in which the process is just as important as the end result. 

 

2. Have you been working on any specific art pieces or series lately?

I’m currently working on a fictional photo narrative in which a story of arriving on earth, finding connection, losing connection and a realisation about the importance of community is being told. The narrative embraces surrealist and absurdist visuals.

 

3. Where do you find inspiration for your work?

 

Inspiration is in everything around me. From my sisters who strut the streets in their most beautiful looks to the way my mother handles a computer. From photos of other young artists I see on Instagram to the lives of the people I date. 

 

4. How have you been practicing self care during this time? 

 

I am lucky to have enough space to properly work out. I have been working out every other day, which keeps me sane and makes me feel healthier in times of spending so much time inside. I’m living in a country which is not in a complete lockdown, so I’m also able to make walks outside every day. All of this in combination with cooking nice meals has kept me quite sane. 

 

5. If you are a working artist, how have you been finding ways to earn income during quarantine? 

 

I am still studying at the art academy in the city I live in. Classes have continued through online platforms and my student loan keeps my head above the water. 

 

6. What does the theme power mean to you?

Power is something I think about every day. It’s a sensibility within social interaction. It lays bare many structures that are the foundation of the societies we live in. It frustrates me sometimes, as I feel powerless in certain situations, but I also see the power that comes with the privileges I grew up with. In a society that is in many ways based on social hierarchies it is unavoidable to experience power, in your own hands or in the hands of others. Power is in every story we tell. The importance is to be aware of the power we have as visual storytellers and artists. 

 

7. How does the theme power apply to the work you submitted for this edition?

The works that I have submitted are fairly different from the works I create at this moment in my life. The series is initiated by one of the models, Elosa Jurgens, in the pictures. We wanted to create visuals in which the girls themselves radiated strength in their own way. To photograph someone is to have power over them, this power can be a conversation or a one way stream. The focus of this series is directed to the conversation between photographer and model. Creating an image that depicts strength in the eyes of the photographed and the photographer. 

 

8. What advice would you give people who are struggling to make or art or be creative during quarantine?

 

You are not your work. Your worth is not defined by your work. So your self image shouldn’t be determined by your production value. To have fun is a political statement in a world which polices your existence.

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